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EMF Studies

25 June 2014

Electromagnetic Field Sensitivity: 1991 Study by Dr. W.J. Rea

"We concluded that this study gives strong evidence that electromagnetic field sensitivity exists, and can be elicited under environmentally controlled conditions."

Electromagnetic Field Sensitivity
Source: This article was first published in 1991 in the Journal of Bioelectricity, 10(1&2), 241-256. Figure 1is not included here, but can be obtained by writing Dr. W. J. Rea at the Environmental Health Center, Dallas, 8345 Walnut Hill Lane, Suite 205, Dallas, TX 75231.

William J. Rea, MD, FACS
Environmental Health Center, Dallas
8345 Walnut Hill Lane, Suite 205
Dallas, TX 75231

Yaqin Pan, MD
Dept. of Allergy, Beijing Union Medical College Hospital Beijing, PRC

Ervin J. Yenyves, PhD
Dept. of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas

Iehiko Sujisawa, MD. and Hideo Suyama, MD
Dept. of Ophthamology, Kitasato University Kitasato, Japan

Nasrola Samadi, PhD
Jacksonville State University, Jacksonville, Florida

Gerald H. Ross, M.D., CCFP
Environmental Health Center, Dallas

Source: This article was first published in 1991 in the Journal of Bioelectricity, 10(1&2), 241-256. Figure 1is not included here, but can be obtained by writing Dr. W. J. Rea at the Environmental Health Center, Dallas, 8345 Walnut Hill Lane, Suite 205, Dallas, TX 75231.

Abstract
A multiphase study was performed to find an effective method to evaluate electromagnetic field (EMF) sensitivity of patients. The first phase developed criteria for controlled testing using an environment low in chemical, particulate, and EMF pollution. Monitoring devices were used in an effort to ensure that extraneous EMF would not interfere with the tests. A second phase involved a single-blind challenge of 100 patients who complained of EMF sensitivity to a series of fields ranging from 0 to 5 MHz in frequency, plus 5 blank challenges. Twenty-five patients were found who were sensitive to the fields, but did not react to the blanks. These were compared in the third phase to 25 healthy naive volunteer controls. None of the volunteers reacted to any challenge, active or blank, but 16 of the EMF-sensitive patients (64%) had positive signs and symptoms scores, plus autonomic nervous system changes. In the fourth phase, the 16 EMF-sensitive patients wer rechallengd twice to the frequencies to which they were most sensitive during the previous challenge. The active frequency was found to be positive in 100% of the challenges, while all of the placebo tests were negative. We concluded that this study gives strong evidence that electromagnetic field sensitivity exists, and can be elicited under environmentally controlled conditions.

Introduction
Interaction mechanisms that underlie the health and biological effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) on humans have been studied by many authors.1,2,3,4,5,6 This subject was reviewed recently at the 1990 spring meeting of the American Physical Society .7 Choy et. al.8 investigated individuals with multiple sensitivities who reported reactions to various types of electrical equipment, including power lines, electronic office equipment such as typewriters and computer terminals, video display terminals, household appliances (such as hair dryers), and fluorescent lights.

This paper presents preliminary data on electromagnetic field tests using a square wave generator to evaluate the EMF sensitivity of patients reporting such sensitivities under environmentally controlled and monitored conditions.
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http://www.feb.se/emfguru/Ehs/electromagnetic-sensitivity.html

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