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EMF Studies

06 December 2015

Brain Tumor Rates Are Rising in the US: The Role of Cell Phone & Cordless Phone Use

(Choice of image by Editor of "Towards Better Health")
Brain Tumor Rates Are Rising in the US: The Role of Cell Phone & Cordless Phone Use
saferemr.com, 23 November 2015

One in 161 Americans (0.62%) will be diagnosed with brain or other central nervous system (CNS) cancer during their lifetime according to the Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States.

The risk is greater for males (1 in 144 or 0.69%) than females (1 in 182 or 0.55%): About three out of four people (74%) who develop brain or CNS cancer will die from this disease.

The risk of being diagnosed with a non-malignant (i.e., non-cancerous) brain or CNS tumor is about twice as great (14.75 vs. 7.23 per 100,000 per year).



2015 CBTRUS Fact Sheet

Excerpts

The incidence rate of all primary malignant and non-malignant brain and CNS tumors is 21.97 cases per 100,000 for a total count of 356,858 incident tumors; (7.23 per 100,000 for malignant tumors for a total count of 117,023 incident tumors and 14.75 per 100,000 for non-malignant tumors for a total count of 239,835 incident tumors). The rate is higher in females (23.95 per 100,000 for a total count of 206,565 incident tumors) than in males (19.82 per 100,000 for a total count of 150,271 incident tumors).

An estimated 77,670 new cases of primary malignant and non-malignant brain and CNS tumors are expected to be diagnosed in the United States in 2016. This includes an estimated 24,790 primary malignant and 52,880 non-malignant that are expected to be diagnosed in the US in 2016.

Pediatric Incidence (Ages 0-14 Years)
The incidence rate of childhood primary malignant and non-malignant brain and CNS tumors in the US is 5.37 cases per 100,000 for a total count of 16,366 incident tumors. The rate is higher in males (5.61 per 100,000) than females (5.11 per 100,000).

An estimated 4,630 new cases of childhood primary malignant and non-malignant brain and CNS tumors are expected to be diagnosed in the US in 2016.

Pediatric & Adolescent Incidence (Ages 0-19 Years)
The incidence rate of childhood and adolescent primary malignant and non-malignant brain and CNS tumors in the US is 5.57 per 100,000 for a total count of 23,113 incident tumors. The rate is higher in males (5.60 per 100,000) than females (5.54 per 100,000).

An estimated 4,620 new cases of primary malignant and non-malignant brain and CNS tumors are expected to be diagnosed in the US in 2015.

Adolescent & Young Adult (AYA) Incidence (Ages 15-39 Years)
The incidence rate of AYA primary malignant and non-malignant brain and CNS tumors is 10.47 cases per 100,000 for a total count of 53,083 incident tumors.1 The rate is higher for non-malignant tumors (6.17 per 100,000) than malignant tumors (3.26 per 100,000).

An estimated 10,390 new cases of AYA primary malignant and non-malignant brain and CNS tumors are expected to be diagnosed in the US in 2016.

Mortality
The average annual mortality rate in the US between 2008 and 2012 was 4.31 per 100,000 with 71,831 deaths attributed to primary malignant brain and CNS tumors.

An estimated 16,616 deaths will be attributed to primary malignant brain and CNS tumors in the US in 2016.

Lifetime Risk
From birth, a person in the US has a 0.62% chance of ever being diagnosed with a primary malignant brain/CNS tumor (excluding lymphomas, leukemias, tumors of pituitary and pineal glands, and olfactory tumors of the nasal cavity) and a 0.46% chance of dying from the primary malignant brain/CNS tumor.

For males in the US, the risk of developing a primary malignant brain/CNS tumor is 0.69%, and the risk of dying from a primary malignant brain/CNS tumor (excluding lymphomas, leukemias, tumors of pituitary and pineal glands, and olfactory tumors of the nasal cavity) is 0.51%.

For females in the US, the risk of developing a primary malignant brain/CNS tumor is 0.55%, and the risk of dying from a primary malignant brain/CNS tumor (excluding lymphomas, leukemias, tumors of pituitary and pineal glands, and olfactory tumors of the nasal cavity) is 0.41%.

Prevalence
The prevalence rate for all primary brain and CNS tumors was estimated to be 221.8 per 100,000 (61.9 per 100,000 for malignant; 177.3 per 100,000 for non-malignant) in 2010. It was estimated that more than 688,096 persons were living with a diagnosis of primary brain and central nervous system tumor in the United States in 2010 (malignant tumors: more than 138,054 persons; non-malignant tumors: more than 550,042 persons).

The prevalence rate for all pediatric (ages 0-19) primary brain and central nervous system tumors was estimated at 35.4 per 100,000 with more than 28,000 children estimated to be living with this diagnosis in the United States in 2004.

Note
Estimated numbers of incidence of malignant and non-malignant brain and CNS tumors and deaths due to these tumors were calculated for 2015 and 2016 using age-adjusted annual tumor incidence rates generated for 2000-2012 for non-malignant tumors by state, age, and histologic type.
http://bit.ly/cbtrus2015
November 3, 2015

Brain Tumors in Children and Adolescents

According to a recent study, there has been a significant increase in the incidence of primary malignant brain and central nervous system (CNS) tumors in American children (0-14 years of age) between 2000-2010, with an annual percentage change (APC) of 0.6%. In adolescents (15-19 years old), there was a significant increase in the incidence of primary malignant brain and CNS tumors between 2000-2008, with an APC of 1.0%. Adolescents also experienced an increase in non-malignant brain and CNS tumors from 2004-2010, with an APC of 3.9%.

The four-nation CEFALO case-control study found a 36% increased risk of brain tumors among children and adolescents 7-19 years of age who used mobile phones at least once a week for six months. Since this risk estimate was not statistically significant (OR = 1.36; 95% CI = 0.92 to 2.02), the authors dismissed this overall finding. However, in a subsample of 556 youth for whom cell phone company records were available, there was a significant association between the time since first mobile phone subscription and brain tumor risk. Children who used cellphones for 2.8 or more years were twice as likely to have a brain tumor than those who never regularly used cellphones (OR = 2.15, 95% CI = 1.07 to 4.29).

August 25, 2015

The likelihood of developing a non-malignant brain tumor has increased in recent years in the U.S. According to newly-released data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the overall age-adjusted incidence (per 100,000 persons) of non-malignant brain tumors significantly increased from 2004 through 2012. The increase was observed among children 0-19 years of age (1.7 in 2004; 2.3 in 2012) and among adults 20 years and older (15.9 in 2004; 19.7 in 2012).

Almost 200 people per day in the U.S. were diagnosed with brain tumors in 2012 including 67,612 adults and 4,615 children. Among adults, 70% of these tumors were nonmalignant, and among children, 42% were nonmalignant.

The overall incidence of malignant tumors in the U.S. has been stable for children (3.4 in 2004; 3.3 in 2012) and has slightly decreased for adults (9.1 in 2004; 8.4 in 2012). However, lags in reporting to tumor registries are common in the U.S. so official statistics may underestimate the actual incidence of tumors for more recent years (see August 5, 2015 post below).

A peer-reviewed study reported a significant Increase over time in the incidence of specific types of malignant brain tumors among adults in the U.S. (see May 7, 2015 post below).

The age-adjusted incidence of the most common non-malignant tumor, meningioma, significantly increased among adults from 2004 through 2012 (8.7 in 2004; 10.6 in 2012).

A recent study reported a significant increase in meningioma incidence for the period 2004 through 2009 (Dolecek et al., 2015). Several case-control studies have found a significant association between risk of meningioma and wireless phone use (see May 7, 2015 post below).

The age-adjusted incidence of pituitary gland tumors significantly increased among children (0.4 in 2004; 0.6 in 2012) and among adults (3.4 in 2004; 4.7 in 2012).

A prospective study of 790,000 women in the United Kingdom reported that the risk pituitary gland tumors was more than twice as high among women who used a cell phone for less than five years as compared to never users (Benson et al., 2013).

The web-based report, United States Cancer Statistics: 1999-2012 Incidence and Mortality Web-based Report (USCS) is available at www.cdc.gov/uscs. Although the report includes cancer cases diagnosed (incidence) from 1999 through 2012, brain tumor incidence data are available only since 2004. In 2012, cancer incidence information came from central cancer registries in 49 states, 6 metropolitan areas, and the District of Columbia, covering 99% of the U.S. population.

The Interactive Cancer Atlas (InCA), with exportable data, shows how rates differ by state and change over time. InCA is available at https://nccd.cdc.gov/DCPC_INCA/.

http://www.saferemr.com/2015/05/brain-tumor-rates-are-rising-in-us-role.html

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