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EMF Studies

25 July 2016

Soaring Numbers of Teenagers Are Being Diagnosed with Tinnitus

"After headaches, tinnitus is one of the most common symptoms of
electromagnetic hypersensitivity" 
#tinnitus #EHS
The conclusion of a 2016 scientific paper on tinnitus and cell phones states: "This study collected evidence for the association between exposure to EMRFR [electromagnetic radiofrequency radiaiton] and tinnitus in some patients, particularly those suffering from electromagnetic hypersensitivity. While it is not fully confirmed, the authors consider it appropriate to direct more attention to cell phone use in the diagnostic investigation of patients with hearing disorders, especially tinnitus. (Click here for text of study.)

The Daily Mail journalist shares what one of the authors of the study has to say, but does not mention the possible role of electromagnetic radiation in causing tinnitus.

Are teenagers making themselves DEAF by listening to music? Surge in early tinnitus could mean scores of millennials 'lose hearing before they hit 40'
by Mia De Graaf For Dailymail.Com, 13 July 2016

- Tinnitus is increasingly common in teenagers, a new study has found
- But young people do not seem concerned to see a doctor about it
- Experts warn it could lead to widespread hearing loss in years to come Scores of millennials could be deaf by the time they reach 40 - because they're listening to music too loud, a new study claims.

Soaring numbers of teenagers are being diagnosed with tinnitus, a permanent ringing or hissing sound in your ear that is a key symptom of hearing loss.



It is normally common among older people.

But a new paper published in Scientific Reports says the condition is becoming more prevalent in younger groups due to long spells of listening to loud music using earbuds.

Worryingly, however, teens seem unfussed about getting the condition checked out by a doctor.

Following reports and studies into teenage tinnitus, a team at the University of Sao Paulo's Medical School used an otoscope to examine the ears of 170 students aged 11 to 17.

They also interviewed the students about tinnitus, asking whether they had experienced it in the last 12 months, and if so what was the volume, duration and frequency.

Over half (54.7 per cent) had experienced it, and the majority of them reported listening to loud music on a regular basis.

'This level of prevalence is alarming,' Tanit Ganz Sanchez, associate professor of otolaryngology at the school, said.

'If this teen generation continue to expose themselves to very high noise levels, they'll probably suffer from hearing loss by the time they're 30 or 40.'

Tinnitus is caused by damage to cochlear hair cells in the inner ear, which stretch and contract in accordance with sound-induced vibrations.

Very loud noises - at a club or played over headphones - overload these cells, leaving them temporarily or permanently damages.

The damage forces other parts of the ear to overwork to compensate for the loss of function, causing tinnitus and eventually chronic hearing loss.

Dr Sanchez warns that these teenagers will permanently damage their cochlear hair cell synapses if they continue blasting music from now until the age of 20 or 25.

But the increasing rate of diagnoses shows no sign of letting up as teenagers do not seem as concerned about the condition as adults.

'We found that adolescents perceive tinnitus very often but unlike adults don't worry about it and don't complain to parents or teachers, for example,' Dr Sanchez said.

'As a result, they aren't seen by a doctor or hearing specialist, and the problem can become chronic.'

WHAT IS TINNITUS?

Tinnitus is caused by damage to cochlear hair cells in the inner ear, which stretch and contract in accordance with sound-induced vibrations.

Very loud noises - at a club or played over headphones - overload these cells, leaving them temporarily or permanently damages.

The damage forces other parts of the ear to overwork to compensate for the loss of function, causing tinnitus and eventually chronic hearing loss.

Dr Sanchez warns that these teenagers will permanently damage their cochlear hair cell synapses if they continue blasting music from now until the age of 20 or 25.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-3688845/Are-teenagers-making-DEAF-listening-music-Surge-early-tinnitus-mean-scores-millennials-lose-hearing-hit-40.html#ixzz4EyOzoM48

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